October 30, 1945

Keijo (Seoul), Korea

30 October 1945

Sarah, My Darling:

Again this evening I was pleasantly surprised with the arrival of more mail. There were your letters of October 18th and 21st. And also a letter from Jean Claggett in 3 from ones who lost loved ones in the Okinawa campaign. The letters were so very very good and I was happy to have them. They help so very much but I’m so lonesome and anxious to be with you again. As things are now, I have all of your letters to the present time with the exception of yours for August 22nd and October 20th. After looking back over that sentence, I see that I didn’t make it very clear. I mean I have all of your letters now up through the 21st of October.

Seoul, Korea. 1945.

  This has been a long tiresome day. Early this morning I received a call from our Division Chaplain to go with him to attend a very important meeting at Corps Headquarters. It lasted until 3 this afternoon. Darling, I cannot go into detail now but it took a long time discussing some of the religious problems here in Korea. The Federal Council of Churches are supposed to have two or three representatives here sometime in the near future, and I was one of the chaplains picked by the Corp to give a report of some of my observations with the soldiers and also the state of religious life here in the Korea. And then they also tried to encourage me to change my NO to YES and be promoted to a Major and become Division Chaplain or go up to Corps as an Assistant Corps Chaplain. I told our Corp Chaplain that I appreciated all his kind remarks and being thought of it, but definitely I felt led to say NO and not continue my Army career any longer than the Lord lead under my present status as a chaplain in Army. Don’t worry my Darling, I’m not changing my mind. Even if you could be with me after having signed up for further service, I do not think it would be the best. And that even feeling deep in my heart that nothing on this side of heaven can or will be better than being with you again in the work which we enjoy the most. I only hope that I’ll be able to start back to you sometime in February or March.

  According to your last letter, Margie has certainly been very sick with that miserable cold. I do hope that she is better by now. I hope having the doctor helped and that she will soon be well. Immediately following supper I came over here to the chaplain’s office and studied until the time for Bible class. There were 15 in attendance at our class this evening and we certainly had a very fine discussion. We got down through the 33rd verse of the 8th chapter. These classes have certainly been very helpful to me. I wish you could be in them Dear, for I feel sure that you could contribute some very fine food for thought in our discussions.

  I wanted to get this started immediately following Bible class but three different men came in to see me that took a long time. You can never know when someone will be in to see you. In fact, your time is not your own, many times it seems to belong to someone else. Don’t misunderstand me because I do like to be busy for it helps the time slip by that much faster and I can be with you then. I always want to be available and helpful for the men whenever they need or want to see me for any reason whatsoever.

  Dear, don’t you ever worry about me having trouble finding it hard to get used to civilian life. I get rather disgusted with some of the articles I’ve read about how one soldier ought to be treated when he returns. I say it humbly, I’ve never found it too hard to get along in any different situation or circumstance I’ve ever been in and I take no credit for it, but all that I am or ever hope to be I owe to Christ and to you, my darling wife. I’m not at all worried about the transition from Army to civilian life.

  Margie being so sick is probably a great strain on poor Mom. I hope everything is alright by the time this letter reaches you. When I come back I will do my best to get things going so we won’t make it hard on the folks. I certainly don’t want to be a burden or worry to them. I do hope I shall never give to dear Mom or the Chief cause to wonder or worry about us. You can be assured that I’ll do my best to make it easy for them when I return. You can always be assured that I’ll pray for Bob and Margie. I thought Bob would be probably much more settled after having been in the Army this long. Now that he has a regular job it will probably help him settle down.

  Darling, it is very late and I’m so tired even though I didn’t work hard or do much today. God bless you and be sure to give the folks my love.

 I’m always just yours in Christ’s

 love for we are one in Him,

 Willis

 Colossians 3:3

 P.S. Enclosed find the last letter from Mil.

One thought on “October 30, 1945

  • John T Reed
    October 30, 2019, 3:40 am

    “I’ve never found it too hard to get along in any different situation or circumstance I’ve ever been in and I take no credit for it, but all that I am or ever hope to be I owe to Christ and to you, my darling wife. I’m not at all worried about the transition from Army to civilian life.”
    This was certainly the credo he lived by for all his life!

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