March 18, 1946

March 18, 1946 

Dearest Darling Willis —

Today was another wonderful day as far as mail from you is concerned, Lover. This morning the two envelopes of free mail arrived, and this afternoon I got 9 letters from you – February 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 19th, 21st, 22nd and March 7th and 8th. And then besides, the lovely, lovely white blouse came. Darling, it is the most beautiful one I have ever seen and you are so sweet to send it to me. Honestly, you’re spoiling me, Darling. Of course, I had to press it and try it on right away, and it just fits. And then I had Margie take my picture in it and it was the last picture on the film, so I’ll have it developed and send it to you as soon as possible. Darling, a blouse like that would cost at least $20 here, and then I’m sure you could never get one as lovely. You have such good taste, Darling, and I thank you again and again. Of course, I read all of your letters all at once and had a wonderful time. It was so good to have them. Darling, please don’t wear yourself out entirely – I want a little of you left to love me with.

  I’ve been right here in the house all day except tonight when I had to go to church. I’ve been working on my thesis, and have about 11 more pages, which I’m going to try to have Dr. Mason look over tomorrow. That doesn’t sound like very much for a day, but I had so much material to go over and organize and boil down that it took a long time. I think I can finish it in one or two more days – unless Mason makes me rewrite a lot of it, which isn’t at all unlikely.

Bob Price. 1943

  Bob was home all day sick in bed. I don’t know what it is, probably an upset stomach. He was sick in the night also. They ate so much junk yesterday and I think that is the main trouble, although he had a fever all day. I doubt very much if he will be out tomorrow either. Margie was sick this morning as usual, but she felt all right after that and went to work. Mom went to the doctor again and stayed downtown for a while. Her skin is really clearing up – she has had that itching for over 20 years, and the shots he is giving her are really making her skin nice and smooth again. I am truly thankful that she got to go to him. She came home with a pair of drapes for my room – white sateen with pretty flowers in them, which she got for $4.50 a pair, which is almost giving them away as draperies go. She said they had another pair like them down there, clean (hers were a little soiled and wrinkled) for $5.79, so I had her call up and order them for us.  We didn’t have any nice bedroom drapes or any at all if you remember, Lover, and I thought at that price we couldn’t lose anything. Now, all we have to do is get a home and the window to hang them at. Most sets of drapes start at about $10 and go on up these days.

  Tonight I had to go to the meeting of the Youth Board of Deacons. We had quite an interesting meeting for a change. Lourie Larson told us a little about the plans for the new church – they have decided to build a Colonian instead of a gothic church because (1) – it will cost half as much as a Gothic church which will mean they can start on the educational remodeling sooner than they had hoped to, and (2) it will be more informal and friendly, in keeping with the spirit of the church. I  always did like a Colonial atmosphere myself, but I don’t think of the bulk of the North Shore people would take to a Gothic atmosphere. He also gave his ideas about how they could remodel the old building, but some of it sounded not too good. Well, the architect will have to figure that one out. The only feature I didn’t like about his plan was the one suggestion that Mr. McWhorter made  – that they have a smoking room. I think that is entirely out of place in a church. Incidentally, they are going to have Vaughn Shoemaker as the speaker at the Youth Banquet, which is very good. He shows a film of his own and then draws also. We had quite a discussion about the oratorical contest, which isn’t proving too popular. I think that youth today just don’t want to have to think or put forth any effort. Well, I finally got home about 10:30. I had hoped it would be earlier.

  Well, well. So my sweetie is all curious about what Paul Allen said about him. Goody! At last, I’ve got something left to tell you when you get home. Now maybe you can see a litte how I’ve felt all these years when you said, “Something very interesting happened today, but I’ll tell you when I get home.” I do believe I’ve got at least a thousand such things to hear when you arrive. I’ve told you everything I could think of importance, so I think I’ll have to save at least this little one thing to tell you when you get home. However, I might consider a bargain. Are you in a bargaining mood? OK – here goes. Every letter so far for a month or so now hasen’t had a single word in it about when you might possibly have a bare chance of perhaps in some case starting home, and as you say, (and I quote) “You know those bits of news are so helpful when a person is in a position like this over here.”  Now here is my bargain – if you’ll give me the said information or a reasonable facsimile, I will give you what Paul Allen said, even before you get home, which is quite a concession for me, seeing it is practically the only thing I have left that you are curious about. But you have to tell me first. (Heh-heh)  It’s up to you from here on.  (I feel in a bargaining mood tonight, for a change).

  It is a rainy, coolish night,  after a cloudy day all day long. I want to get up early and go out to school in the morning early and do some reading for M&M. But first, maybe I’ll answer some of your letters. I have a lot now ahead to answer.

  I know your dinner and visit with Dr. Kim, Miss Duncan, and Alrik was very interesting and I’ll be glad to hear all about it. I doubt very much if Dr. Kim had a chance to call me – with all she had to do, I wouldn’t expect her to. She may have, however, at a time when no one was at home. Perhaps I shall get to meet her someday. That was sweet of you to give the Cha’s some more money from us, Dear. Yes, I approve. The Lord has indeed been good to us.

  You must really have been tired on the 16th of February because you dated your letter 16 August. You must have been subconsciously wishing for warmer weather. The pictures Miss Mason gave you are very interesting. I have quite a few of your pictures that aren’t mounted as yet. I haven’t mounted any since the summer, so I’m afraid I have almost enough to start another album. You keep sending pictures from Okinawa, so I want to get them all together so I can mount them all in one place. Yes, it has been very warm here, and the elm trees are even beginning to push out their catkins and the birds are pecking away at them, but I’m afraid they’re going to get their little noses nipped before long. (The buds, not the birds).

  You wondered what made me suspect that Margie and Bob were expecting – well, she was sick in the mornings, for one thing, and then the day before she told me, she went out rather mysteriously, and when she came back her mother called and the conversation was practically a dead giveaway of indefiniteness, and she mentioned September 1, and that is the expected date. She has been sick in the mornings right along except a couple of days when Mom made her take Viavi at night, but that hasn’t been working so well since. Some are sick like that the entire 9 months, and it is no fun.

  Darling, it is almost midnight, and 5:30 will be here all too soon. So I think I better say goodnight and that I love you more than ever. I know the Lord is using and blessing you, and how I pray that He may bring you home very soon.

 I’m just yours, in His eternal love –

 Sarah

 Colossians 3:3 

March 17, 1946

March 17, 1946 

Dearest Darling —

I feel just like a dishrag – a wet, useless dishrag. After a session with the BY like tonight’s, I wonder why I’m working with them at all. You wouldn’t have believed the kids could be so disorderly. We did the best we could with them and finally got them calmed down at the very end enough to read and discuss some scripture, but what went before was terrible. And of course, Mr. Wigent was there tonight. We have really had some very good meetings, but tonight’s was one of the worst. There were six girls and George Hans, and five of the girls just couldn’t calm down. I won’t go into the gory details, but suffice it to say, I was about at my wit’s end. However, after the meeting was over, they did say they were sorry and promised to do better next time – they even apologized of their own free will. I don’t think we will sit in a circle again. But you know, the homes of some of them come from, I’m even surprised they are as likable as they are. They tell you very freely that their mothers yelled them out of the house just before they came, and one said her mother often says she wishes the girl were dead, and then my heart just aches for them. Maybe something will stick and be a help to them. All I can do is do my best and pray for the Lord to do what I can’t. But we surely do need a couple to help us in sponsoring them. Brownie is all right, but she is just a kid – only 18, and continually regales us with the tales of her trials at school and what they do, and you just can’t do that with young people – the sponsors have to be interested in them and what they are doing, not expect them to be interested in your troubles. Well, maybe they can get us someone to help after a while. Anyhow you pray for us, Darling.

  Outside of that, it has been a good day however, and I love you more than ever. I truly thought of you a lot today, Lover. About everyone I talked to asked about you -Vivian Schaefer, Mr. Wigent, Rose Lee Reed, Ruth Skoglund, Mrs. Shogran, Ruth Obenland, Myrtle Johnson, and some others I can’t think of at the present. Incidentally, Mrs. Swanson, whose brother-in-law is over in Korea, told me that he had written that he met you and talked with you – he is a member of North Shore. You haven’t mentioned it in any of the February letters, but of course, I’m still missing some and you may not have mentioned it because I wouldn’t have known him anyway.

North shore Baptist Church – Chicago.

  It has been rainy almost all day and is raining quite hard now. But it isn’t very cold. I suppose it will be colder by tomorrow. All but one of my girls were there today, and for a change, we have an extra long time for class, which was just like heaven. For once I got to do everything I had planned, with the exception of one little thing. I do hope the girls got something out of it that will help them – they all seemed very much interested and participated very well. I love every one of them. I was sitting with one of them in church and she said she would like to join the church, so I talked with her a while about what it means to become a Christian. She also said she didn’t think her mother would let her be a member of North Shore because they are Lutheran – they don’t go to church at all, but they are Lutheran. I told her I would be glad to talk with her mother about it, and said I would call her and see if it would be convenient to come this afternoon. I called later on, but after conference, she said they were going away. I rather suspect it was just an excuse, but maybe not. Perhaps I can go some other time. Dr. Wilson had a good sermon on Jesus and His abiding presence. The Great Lakes Double Quartet was there, having sung in several classes, and they sang, “The Lord’s Prayer,” and “In the Garden,” and it was beautiful. They are negroes, and were here last year. They sing very softly most of the time now, which makes for a lovely tone and harmony and they are about 100% better than they were last year. Tonight they gave quite a few numbers, two secular, and 7 spirituals. They are truly fine men – all of them either college graduates or students. One of them played the violin beautifully also.

  This was the last Sunday of the attendance campaign and we had 1194 in Sunday school this morning. That is pretty close to the all-time high of 1250. The service was jammed to the gills, with people all over the place and even standing up. I just wonder how long it will last when the contest is over. Dr. Wilson preached tonight on, “What’s the sense of joining the Church?”  and it was well done. But today not one person went forward at either service. That seldom happens.

  The kids weren’t home for dinner and they didn’t get home till after we did tonight. They went out to the Dunes and Valparaiso and got back in time for supper at Waldschmidts.  This afternoon I had several phone calls which took a good deal of time, and then I called quite a few of the BY kids, with not much success. I wrote some cards and studied for this Sunday’s and next Sunday’s meetings. By then it was time to go down to church again – Pop drove me down because it was raining.

  So that has been my day, Darling, and I’m glad it is over, for the simple reason that it makes one day less that we will have to be apart. Lover, it will be so wonderful to wake up and work and live with you again. Seems like 900 years since we have been together. I wish it were only that many hours before we would be together again. But I guess that is practically impossible. Anyway, another twenty-four have gone by since I last wrote to you. Dear, I’ll be loving you that much more when you do come home, and I do pray it won’t be much longer. God bless you and use you to His glory.

 Yours and always in His love –

 Sarah

 Colossians 3:3

Auntie Skaggs, Mrs. George, Mr. Abernathy and Dorothy Reid also sent greetings.

The enclosed article was in today’s paper – some write up!

March 16, 1946

March 16, 1946 

Willis, My Darling —

Well, two more letters came from you today – March 2nd and 3rd. It was surely good to get them, Dear, but just the same I was mad. That is some ruling they made, that the chaplains with the least satisfactory service are going to get to come home ahead of the ones who have done good work. I suppose it is logical to want those who have done their work well, but for goodness sake, why should they penalize you who have done your best? I don’t like it a little bit and I think you should do something to try and get home. I don’t know what it would be, but can’t you make it known that you would like to come home? You said when you got in the hospital that you were going to make every possible effort to get home as soon as possible, but so far you haven’t mentioned doing anything about it. Now, Darling, I don’t want you to fawn around and stuff like that, but I do think you should try to do something about it. You remember when you worked at Wilson’s you finally got sick of their taking advantage of you, and they respected you for standing up for your rights. Listen, Willie, they are discharging many chaplains over here who haven’t even been overseas, by declaring them surplus. I know that is true – that is not hearsay. They could get a replacement for you if they wanted to – plenty are just sitting around over here. Now you stand up for your rights and tell them you want to get home and quick. If you don’t make a good hard effort to be home for commencement you’re going to have one heartbroken little wife. If you try and can’t make it, that is something else again. But there are other chaplains who can do a good job there too. It’s not up to you to have to put out the lights and lock the door over there. I’m not asking you to shirk your duty, Darling – I just think they could divide it up a little. After all, it is going on at 27 months since we have seen each other and it’s about to get me. And I love you so much it hurts all over. I definitely don’t want you to have to go back there – that would be worse than anything. But I do want you to come home very very soon. Maybe you’re not telling me what goes on so you can surprise me, I don’t know. But it is pretty hard when you just say you hoped it won’t be too much longer – that could mean anything. I’m lonesome for you, Darling, and I love you and it may be selfish for me to want you to come home, but I don’t think so. The Army has lots of men, including chaplains, but you’re the only husband I have. So it follows in logical order that you are indispensable to me, and not to the Army. There!

Willis on the way to Seoul. December 1945.

  I’ve been right here in the house all day and I can’t say that I’ve exactly wasted the time. Margie had a big washing to do and she was down in the basement all morning. So I vacuumed all the rugs and scrubbed and waxed the kitchen floor, finishing around 1:00. Then I ate lunch and studied all afternoon. I did three lessons on my correspondence course. It is very interesting and helpful too. Then I helped dinner and Margie and I did the dishes and they went out. I washed my hair and when I was in the middle of drying it, the phone rang and it was Helen Christie, of course. She wanted to tell me that Pat and Gilbert Davis are the parents of a baby boy born last week. They named him after a Gil. No more details. I surely hope they can make a go of it. She is feeling better.  Pop made a dozen more flies tonight – he has 100 that he has made so far. I suppose he will have a wonderful time using them up this summer.

  I imagine your broadcast was very good, although I still don’t have the letter telling about it. Incidentally, John Damiani is in the Navy, not the Army. I think I heard that Bill Spence is out and has a church now. I’m so glad you got to be with Alrik for a while. I know you must have had a good time together. When does he expect to be home? You probably have my letter now telling you about Sherry’s letter to the telling of their expected addition. Your mail has truly been coming in mixed up, hasn’t it? Even worse than mine, if that is possible.

  That was some experience with the Jeep coming back from Jinsen.  I hope it is all fixed up by now. Well, Sweetheart, it is getting late and I want to get a good night’s sleep because tomorrow will be a full day. It is been gray all day, warm and raining most of the afternoon and evening, and it just thundered.

  Sweetheart, I love you so much and how I pray that you may come home soon.

 God bless you in everything.

 Forever yours in His love –

 Sarah

 Colossians 3:3

 Darling – I only said what I said because I love you – and I think the Lord expects us to fight once in a while.

March 15, 1946

March 15, 1946 

Willis, My Darling —

No mail from you today, Darling, but I’m not too surprised. After 8 letters yesterday I shouldn’t complain, but I would love to have some more late mail as well as your older letters. I love you so very much, Darling. This has been a long day and I thought about you a lot. Lover, I surely hope it won’t be too long before you can be back home. I’m so lonesome for you.

 

streetcars 1940s Chicago.

This has been a long day for me. Bob was driving to work this morning as he thought maybe he would have to work tonight and he didn’t want to have to wait for streetcars. So I rode downtown with him. I was especially glad for the ride this morning because we had a pea soup fog and it was raining a sort of drizzle and it was nice not to have to wait for cars. So I got there about 8:05. Mr. Paul wasn’t there yet, so I was hard at work typing when he came in. He peeked around the door, rubbed his eyes, looked at his watch, and in general put on an act of being surprised, which of course he was. So I really did put in a day at the office. I was busy all day long too. I almost got a trial balance – was $1 out at the end and couldn’t find it, worse luck. I also typed the long monthly report and several letters and then some more bookkeeping and several other things. I was glad to be busy however, for then I don’t get so lonely.

  Mr. Paul was telling me about the meeting they had at Buena to decide on Dr. Hepburn’s resignation. It was very orderly, and they put the motion to read that they accepted his resignation as pastor, and made him Pastor Emeritus at $2,000 per year salary, which is truly nice for him. But Mr. Paul is disgusted with the whole thing and says they are going to take their letters to the Park Ridge Methodist Church. I still can’t understand Dr. Hepburn – I really think he is getting childish or that his mind is a little touched. At least I hope he isn’t in his right mind and acting as he is. We can talk about it better when you come home, Lover. But I just pray the hurts in the church will be healed and that they may go on and do good work for the Lord. But such things usually die hard, as you know. Pray for them, Lover. I would hate to be the minister who comes there, frankly, after what has happened and with Dr. Hepburn still in the picture.

  It had cleared by the time I was to come home so I took the bus and got off at Thorndale and Sheridan and walked, as it was still light. It was nice to walk in the cool air for a change. Now that it is still sunlight at the time I come home I think I’ll come that way often.

  We were just finishing supper when the phone rang. And when I answered it the man’s voice said, “Is Mr. Reed there?”  And then when I said you were still overseas, he said, very surprised, “ He is?”  And who do you suppose it was – Arthur Mitchell. I was truly surprised to hear from him. He was just discharged a couple of weeks ago and is on his way to New York. He leaves tomorrow morning on the train. So I told him to come out and he seemed very glad to do so. He got here about 7:30 and left a little before 10:00. He’s a very nice fellow and is surely a talker. Bob and Margie went out, so just the folks and I were here, and we had a very interesting evening. He told us all about Christmas Island and the islands were he was – Saipan and Guam and Japan. And we talked about the Bible and a lot of different cults. He tried to read some Christian Science but got disgusted with it. Then he spent three days with some folks in Washington state who have been writing to him, they are of the ultra dispensationalist type and have got him all mixed up, and he tried to read Dr. DeHaan’s book on the Chemistry of the Blood and got disgusted with that too. He said this woman in Washington tried to make him take all kinds of literature of her special brand, but he didn’t take much of it. I did the best I could to straighten him out on some things and hope it helped, although I know I have so much to learn. He needs help in the form of grounding in the Scriptures. I wish people would lay off giving new converts all that literature, which is mostly lopsided and stressing someone’s hobby. I told him he would be much better off sticking to the Bible. He is thinking of investigating one of the Hebrew Mission training schools in New York. I couldn’t help him very much along that line because I don’t know much about them. I think he is going to contact Reverend Cohen and perhaps he can give him some good help. He asked about you and said how much he thought of you as did all the men. He said he hopes you get home really soon. He was very nervous – couldn’t sit still. I surely hope and pray he gets under the right influences. He is a thinker, isn’t he? It was surely an interesting and profitable evening. I only wish you could have been there too, Lover.

  Mom sent one of the living room rugs to the cleaners and also one of the hallway rugs. We look a little bare. But they needed it. So I’ve had a fairly busy day today. It seems like a long one too.

  Now to answer some more of your letters, Lover – all of them very old. I imagine it is nice and warm over there by now. It was rather warm today here except for the dampness. It is too bad your attendance at church services going down, but I imagine most of your work is in personal contacts, isn’t it? That is, after all, the most effective form of evangelism. And the Lord can use you with a few as with many. I know you always do your level best, Darling, and I love you for that (among other things too numerous to mention.)  It is surely too bad that Dennis can’t play your accompaniment for services. It is a big help to a service. Yes, I imagine it is very good to just sit in a service for a change. I suppose you will want to do that some when you get home – to absorb a little instead of always giving out. Most of all you’ll need time for study and personal devotion though.

  I was very much interested in your visit with the Korean Presbyterian pastor and his wife. They really must have gone through a lot. It makes me very much ashamed before of ever complaining. That was sweet of you to give him the money and soap and matches and I approve, Lover. It is just like you to do that for them. I surely hope your mail is getting through better by now, Beloved. That was a grand letter from Netti and Charlie. I hope we get to see them when you come home. I wonder how they are coming about adopting children. However, with him still in the Army I don’t suppose they have tried too hard as yet. They should be settled before they do it.

  Lover, I’m going to get me to bed so that I can get up early and do a good day’s work tomorrow, and there is plenty to do. I wish I could tell you how much I love you and how much you mean to me, Beloved. You are so precious and I am so thankful to the Lord for all you are to me. I love you more than ever, Darling, and may the Lord continue to bless and use you in His work.

 Forever yours alone and always Dear,

 in His love –

 Sarah

 Colossians 3:3

II  Timothy 2:15 

March 14, 1946

March 14, 1946 

Willis, My Dearest Darling —

Today was surely a red-letter day for me as far as mail went, Darling. I sort of had a feeling I would have a lot of letters when I got home, and sure enough there were no less than eight letters from you! I just whooped when I saw them. They were of various dates – February 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 11, and March 4 and 5. I had about given up on the first two. It was just wonderful to get them all, even if most of them were late. I’m always hungry to know what you have been going, Lover. I read them through twice immediately and they were food for my soul. Darling, I do love you so very much and I’m more lonesome for you than I can ever express in words. The only thing that disappointed me in the letters was that they didn’t mention anything about coming home. I suppose you don’t want to get my hopes up again, and maybe you want to surprise me, but just the same, it would be nice to have a little ray of hope now and then. The paper today said they are going to speed up the discharge of officers very soon, and about 47,000 are to be let out and all of those with two years of service as of next August should be out by then. So you should be out very shortly, I hope. Sweetheart, you grow sweeter to me every single day that passes. I surely hope your mail has started to come in better by now.

  This has been a pretty long day for me, but I haven’t been sleepy all day. I got to school at 8:00 this morning and studied in the library till time for classes. We really had fun in Parliamentary Law this morning as we had our first practice session, with turned out to be very brief. You know how that class goes –  but I think it’s going to be a lot of fun. You think the rules sound so simple, but when someone actually gets up there in front, you can see how it is easy to get confused. We had only two in front this morning because we had an extra speaker. Ray Johnson and Russell Orr and Maurice Dyce of the State Convention were there today, and Ray Johnson was to speak in our class for a few minutes. I learned a lesson in the law of readiness in teaching, incidentally. We had been having a very hilarious time with making motions, amendments, et cetera and right in the midst of it Dr. Whitesell called a halt to give Ray time to speak. Well, it was hard for me to get my mind on what he was saying for a few minutes, from what we had been doing. That is the way with a Sunday school class so many times, and I’m going to try to apply what I found out. Ray gave an excellent short talk and how to be a successful Pastor – he is really full of his message and must be doing a fine job with the ministers of the state. He is plain spoken, but can do it in love, I believe. As he said, the requisites of being a good pastor are, a definite call from God to the ministry and the particular field, a love for people and the ability to get along with even the worst deacon, an ability to help people get along with each other, and ability to help them into the right relationship with God, meaning first the minister must have it himself. It was surely good and although we have talked about it before in classes, it brought it home to me in a new way. I do hope I can be of more help to you and our future work than I have been, Darling, for I want to be my best for my Lord.

  In chapel, Dr. Stiansen made an announcement about the Gleason baby. I think I told you about the trouble they had with it – it had to be operated on when it was three weeks old. Well, just Tuesday it developed a strangulated of the bowel, and they were afraid he couldn’t stand another operation, but it would die without it. The operation was to be at 10:00 but the operating room was in use at the time and they had to wait until 11:00. At 10 minutes to 11:00, the difficulty suddenly disappeared, and when the doctor came, he said no operation was necessary and that it was a miracle that had taken place. We have a marvelous God, don’t we? I’m so glad the baby was saved. Many people were praying for him. Then he also announced that Dr. Ralph Jensen of Southern California passed away very suddenly, and it was a hard blow to the conservative cause. Pray that they may find a man to take his place.

  I spoke to Ray Johnson after class, and he asked about you right away and said to greet you. He said he thinks you should take a month or two before you decide definitely what you want to do when you get back. In the chapel Dr. Orr introduced Merrice Dyce who is the state director of the Christian education and he gave a good talk – he is from Southern Seminary and conservative. Only he was a little hard to listen to because he used such long involved sentences you got sort of mixed up trying to follow him. Ray Johnson was supposed to have half the hour but the other fellow took so long that Dr. Orr just took the rest of it to outline the work of the State Convention, and Ray Johnson will speak tomorrow. I wish you could have been there to hear him. I talked with Dr. Orr briefly after chapel and he wanted to know when you were coming home – he said he had received your letter and answered it. He said if you were coming right away, and he wished you were, he had a job he would like you to do, but he didn’t say what it was. However, that is immediate, so I guess you’re out of luck. Many of the good churches are looking for pastors, but after all, I feel, and I’m sure you do that the only good church for us is the place with the Lord wants us, and He will lead. We will keep praying about it of course, and when you do get back, it will be much easier to talk and think and pray together. But we can never really be apart, can we, Beloved? We had a very interesting session in M&M.

  Don Williams, Alice Kelly, and Chaplain Anderson asked about you too – Anderson finally found an apartment for his family, and I’m very glad. Incidentally, you will be interested that I heard today the school is going to buy the Alcazar for married couples. I hope it works out – but I think they ought to get more facilities for single girls unless they are trying to cut down on them.

 I stopped in to see Gen on my way home. She was in the basement washing and we stayed there and talked and then went up to their apartment. Incidentally, Lover, I bought us a copy of the New Revised New Testament and got Gen and Paul one also from us. Gen was very pleased with it. I have just read a little in it, and I like it very much. Gen had the sad news that Mrs. Zude died the first of this week. That made me feel badly. I suppose she sort of let down after Walter came home and she got to see him. She surely was a lovely character though. Mr. Zude will surely be lonesome without her. But I think the worst news was that John Clark was tried for embezzlement by his company. That was the reason they sent the police after him. And Iris is supposed to be moving to Chicago. Darling, I know it makes you as sick as it does me, and then I hate to bother you with it, but I know you will want to pray for all of them. I don’t know a thing more than that and I hardly know what to do – I hate to call Mrs. Scheu because I don’t want her to think I’m prying, and then I can just imagine how bitter she is. I feel very sorry for Iris and the children and how I pray that John won’t have to go to prison. If I find out anything more I’ll let you know. Dorothy Olson got a letter from Letha Amundsen and Dorothy told Gen. I don’t intend to say anything to anyone else about it, but I surely wish we could do something to help. And I hope and pray it isn’t as bad as it sounds. But they surely need their friends now if ever. Iris’ club gave her a shower because she is leaving. I wish you were here to talk with them, Lover.

  I got home, read your letters, helped a little with supper, and Margie and I did the dishes. Then I studied for quite a while, and now I’m talking with my best and only beloved. Mrs. Koller called me about the Auxiliary program, which I have to plan, finally, and she also asked me about you and said she hopes you get home really soon. That was some experience you had with the Korean New Year’s at Doctor Kim’s. I wish I could have been there. It was just like my tweet heart to give them all he had – and I thoroughly approve and think the folks would too. You are so thoughtful, Darling. I’ll be very interested to hear all about it. It’s nice you got to see Chaplain Meyers. Hope the pictures come out. I’ll also be interested to hear about your conversation with Miss Duncan. She must be a wonderful woman. Australia is a long way away. Darling, I love you more than ever before. God bless you in all the things and bring you home soon.

 Just yours, Dear, in His love –

 Sarah

 Colossians 3:3

March 12, 1946

March 12, 1946 

Willis, My Dearest Darling Husband —

Lover, there was no mail from you again today and I’m so lonesome to hear from you. It just makes me ache inside. But it is one day closer to the day when we can be together, Darling, and I’m so thankful for that. As Mom says, what if we were just starting on this time of separation. Sweetheart, I love you more than ever before.

Picture of Willis’ assistant Don McClintock in Korea. 1946.

  Don McClintock was here today, and it was really good to know him. Darling, I was so glad to meet him and talk with him because he has been with you so recently, but honestly, it made me more lonesome for you than ever. We talked about you practically the whole time he was here, as you can imagine, and now I can think of a thousand things I wanted to ask him about you and didn’t. But just to talk about you made me so happy, Lover. I can easily see why you think so much of him. He’s surely one of the finest young men I have met. I think he will make a fine worker for the Lord. I guess it is because you have said so much about him, and he knows you so well, but he didn’t seem a bit like a stranger. I missed cars and with a little late in getting home – got home about 10 minutes to 2 and he had been here about half an hour but was having a good time talking with Mom. He told me all about what the pictures were for which you sent the negatives, and I showed him the things you sent home from Christmas and elsewhere, and also gave him one of the shell necklaces – I thought he might like one and that you would like him to have one too. He likes your portrait very much also. I had figured out what most of the pictures were correctly, I found. He said you had been having headaches, Lover. You hadn’t mentioned that. I surely hope they’re clearing up. Maybe your neck is out of joint again, or you need your glasses. When you get home, I’ll give you some good rubbings. He told me about some of the conditions that you had mentioned over there, we talked about schools, etc. Incidentally Lover, most of the schools are full already for September entrance, so if you want to get into any you had better put in your application soon. It is very hard to know what you are thinking along that line, as you haven’t said lately, but when we are together and can pray together about it, I’m sure the Lord will work it out all right. He was quite surprised that Paul Wells was going to get to come home so soon, as I was. He mentioned some of the things that you have mentioned about him, but I didn’t press the matter. I’d rather talk with you, Lover. Don is truly a fine Christian and he surely thinks the world and all of  you, Darling. Of course, I think he is absolutely right in that respect. He says you are a real inspiration to him. Again I agree too, for you have always been and always will be to me too, Sweetheart. He thinks my ring is lovely too, as he will probably tell you. He said he would write to you tonight. We wanted him very much to stay for supper, and I had asked him to before, but he couldn’t this time. He left about 4:15 I think, and he said he would call again when he comes in for Youth for Christ. He also told me to be sure to let him know as soon as I find out you were coming home. For some reason, he seemed certain that you could not possibly be away any later than June. Have you gotten any feelings about when you are coming home like you did as to when you would leave, Lover? Sometimes I think you are psychic. Margie came home early as she didn’t feel very well, and so she got to meet him and she and Mom think he is very fine too. Sweetheart, I suppose you will think this is foolish, but if you could get one of those rice threshing mats I think it would be interesting to have, for missionary education – also any of the other ordinary things the Korean people have around their homes. Well, Darling, all in all, it was a most interesting afternoon, but as I said before it made the lonely ache for you even worse inside me. I surely pray it won’t be very much longer before you can come home, Darling.

  It has been exactly like spring today – very warm and there was a very strong wind from the southwest. The grass is even green again. Looks good. It will be spring in just a few days too and that hardly seems possible.

  Sweetheart, I love you so very much. Darling, if you are going to be at Rockford for a few days when you come back, would you care if I went out there? Ruth did when Joe came back, and Don said he thought it would be a good idea – in fact, he suggested that I do it. I won’t if you don’t want me to, but I’d surely love to. He agreed with me that it would be rather foolish for me to go to the coast to meet you, because you have no way of knowing where you will land, and you will have to travel with the Army anyway. So I’ll just wait for you here, or maybe see you in Rockford. We shall see. Darling, I hope it won’t be long till that time.

  School was very good today. Whitesell just discussed amendments, etc. and never did get around to having anyone preside. Mrs. Heating and a very fine lecture for the use of activities in religious education, and it was most helpful to me. Dr. Mason’s mother passed away yesterday – she was 79. I went to see him about my thesis, and he says the first 21 pages that I have handed in last week are all right to have typed up in the final form now. I gave him the next 15 pages and want to have some more ready to give him Thursday if I can. Wendell Loveless spoke in Chapel on Gospel Broadcasting, and it was very good. I took notes for future reference. As he said, that field is very special and has a technique all its own. I’ll tell you more about what he said when I see you. He surely has a fine gentle Christian manner. Yesterday was Dr. Koller’s 50th birthday so we had to sing Happy Birthday to him today. I was surprised, I thought he was at least 60. Dr. Mantey brought up the subject of his birthday by asking if anyone knew why bald-headed men are successful, and then said it was because they’re always coming out on top. So Dr. Koller had to make some appropriate remarks about how he tried to distribute what hair is he has left to the best advantage and make them go as far as possible – and we all had a good laugh.

  I got to school before 8:00 this morning and did a lot of reading for M&M. That is a good way to do it even if it does mean getting up earlier. Then I study my Parliamentary Law on the streetcar both ways, and that way I can save a lot of study time. Incidentally, Lover, I don’t think I told you I got the highest mark in the class in the M&M final. However, she counted it on par with all the rest of our work. I don’t yet have my average for that class. I should get good grades – I’m not taking much work. I ate a quick lunch with Gen and Paul.

  After dinner, Margie and I did the dishes and then I rubbed her neck. She has a headache and hasn’t felt well all day. She is rather upset because Bob is so discontented with his job and keeps saying he wants to quit and go out and build a house and just raise enough to eat. He will have to realize that he is a married man with the wife and pretty soon a baby to support, but he can’t just do as he pleases anymore. It will do him good to have him realize his responsibilities. I wish you would pray about it, Lover.

  I was so lonesome for you I couldn’t get my mind on studying, so I thought I would just talk with you a little, Darling, and now I feel better, although I’m still just as lonesome as before. Sweetheart, I’m so very thankful for the way the Lord is using you out there and I do praise Him for the way He has kept us both. I wish I could tell you in some wonderful way how much you mean to me, Darling. I love you so. And I will always love you even more than now. God bless you and keep you, Dearest.

 Forever just yours in Christ’s love, Dear,

 Sarah

 Colossians 3:3

March 10, 1946

March 10, 1946 

Willis, My Darling —

One more day closer together, Darling, and how glad I am for that. And I heard there is hope for better mail service too. The folks got home last night and Mom said that Mabel said she read that General MacArthur is all upset about the way the mail isn’t getting through, and that all the air mail is being sent by ship, which explains the delay in your letters, and then tonight Alice Becerra was at church and she said that she heard on the radio that he has ordered that all GI mail is to come thru by plane from now on, so I hope it is true. That will surely be a big help. I hope it works. It seems to me that is the least they could do right now. The post office at San Francisco is supposed to be stacked sky high with mail too. At least there is hope. I’m so lonesome to hear from you, Darling it will be a week tomorrow since I’ve had a letter. But no doubt you are going through the same thing. It makes me realize all the more how much I love you and how much I miss you, Sweetheart. You are so precious to me and I love you with all my heart. I surely hope it won’t be too much longer before we can be together again, Lover.

Sarah receiving letters from and sending letters to Willis. 1943.

This has truly been a full day for me – I haven’t relaxed a minute except when I was in the church service, and then, of course, you aren’t really relaxed. But I have no doubt you are far busier. Anyway, I was glad to be busy for then I didn’t have time to get so lonesome, but I really thought about you a lot, Lover. So many people asked about you and that helped – Mrs. George, Ruth and mother Reid, Mary Lou Buck, Dr. Schultz from school, who spoke to the high school BY tonight, Mrs. Mantey, who is along (Dr. Mantey is Momence today),  Floy Frasher Oliver – I met her husband at last, Emma Layman who just got back from Florida all healthy and happy, Nellie Conklin – she hasn’t been well but is better, and Florence is so much better but didn’t feel up to coming tonight, but she said to greet you and say they are still praying for you and said also that the Lord has answered prayer and they have just gotten a unanimous decision from the court that Dorothy is to come back to them, and now all they have to do is get her back and she wants to come back – she is 16 now – and I was so glad to hear they finally won out, Abernathys, Alice Eadie, Edith Norman, and some others – it’s hard to remember when so many asked all day long.

  I wore my new hat today and that I made yesterday and quite a few said they liked it, but Bob laughed when he saw it, so I suppose you will too – but it isn’t any crazier than the hats you have seen in the street – you wouldn’t believe some of the creations they have now if I told you. I had Mom take my picture in it, so you can see it and look at it when you feel sad. Anyway, all it cost was $0.40 for the frame, so will be no great loss if I don’t wear it much. It has been a very lovely day, although there was a raw damp wind. I had six girls in class this morning – the same little one was absent that doesn’t get up very fast, and then the two new girls weren’t there. We really had a pretty good lesson I think and I just pray that helped them. We were talking about the stewardship of money and they seemed very much interested.

  We had a good crowd in church and Dr. Wilson preached on Jesus and His tears, and it was pretty good. I sat between two of my girls, and when Dr. Wilson gave the invitation one of them looked up and said to me, “ I’m a Christian, I was born a Christian.”  So I told her no one is born a Christian, but they have to become one, and then she said, “Well, my mother is a Christian,”  and so I explained it to her a little more and I said I would talk with her tonight. This afternoon I wrote out some of the verses dealing with the plan of salvation, and then after BY tonight I talked it over with her and explained it some more and she promised to read the verses again and pray about it, and I’m going to talk with her again next week. It made me very happy that she said that, for it gave a good opening for me, and I wish you would pray for her, Lover. She is one of the most intelligent girls in the class and I feel it will be a real decision for Christ when she decides. Another one of my girls was baptized tonight, and that made me very happy. My girls are just about the best age, or rather the age when most are accepting Christ and it is a real privilege to try and lead them to Him.

  We thought we would go out for dinner, but Pop doesn’t like restaurants so we came home and ate mostly the remains of what I had to cook last night for the kids. Then I glanced over the paper and then wrote to my whole class, wrote out references for my little girl, and went over the BY meeting again. Just as I was leaving for the church, the phone rang and it was LeoneVarley. She was not going to be able to attend the choir dinner at Buena and thought I might like to attend it instead, which was very lovely of her, but I thought I had a teacher’s meeting, and frankly I wasn’t too crazy about going, so I didn’t take her up. Every time I talk with anyone at Buena, the situation is all they can talk about. You know how those things are. I just pray the gap will be healed somehow.

  I started out for church rather hoping to make three calls on the way, but I only got to make one of them – on the girl who is absent and has been several times. Her mother wasn’t home so I talked with the mother’s sister, and she wouldn’t let me see Mary Beth because she wasn’t cleaned up, so I tried to impress on her how important it was to have the children there. I hope it did some good. Then I went down to church and waited for the rest to come. I talked to Mildred Williams about getting someone from the Beacon class to take over the library of the Junior Department. because I find that when I have charge of it, I don’t have a chance to talk with my class either before or after Sunday school, and that is too bad. I’ll have to give it up eventually anyway, I imagine, when you come back, and they might just as well get someone else in there now. Anyway, someone else could use a job there. So we shall see. Perhaps we can get Hilde Matthews to do it. By the way, Mrs. Crissy also inquired about you

  We had a rather violent planning session and BY meeting tonight – we had three boys at the session, and Eileen Kirkman, which is some combination. There were seven kids there, and it didn’t go too well. I wish we had a man up there, for with fellows that age, they need a man’s touch. Especially Garland Hatfield. He is a smart boy and I like him, but he is at that terrible show-off stage and it is practically impossible to keep him from acting like an idiot. I suppose he will come out all right – surely hope so. Sometimes when we think they are getting the least they are getting the most. Right in the middle of the planning session I was informed that the youth pastor and co-pastor and Ray Parry and I were to have a meeting about our message, so I had to leave Brownie in charge for that, for a few minutes.  We have it worked out in general, and now the specific part comes on apace. Hope it works – we are going to speak on, “ God’s Powerful in Youth” and develop it along three lines – powerful in the past (which is my part),  the present (Mitchell Kietzman), and the future (Marlin Tabb).  You pray for us all, Lover.

  We had a very large evening service – it was “Home for Keeps” night, in charge of the Married peoples Class, and was dedicated to the returned servicemen, and how I wish you were there too, Lover. The choir sang Battle Hymn of the Republic, which always makes me cry, and they had two colors brought in and each return veteran had to stand and tell his name and the farthest from home he was while in the service. It was quite interesting. Then Richard Schreiber sang “The Trumpeter” very beautifully. The sermon, “What’s the Sense of Doing Unto Others,”  was good. We had a social hour later – big mob. I had a nice talk with Vivian Schaefer and she sent her best wishes. She said Reverend Dollar is leaving as soon as his year is up – the church is going way down, which makes me feel badly, as it does everyone. I do hope they get someone good in there. Edith Norman is going to see Louis this weekend is all thrilled. Margie and Bob may get an apartment in three or four months. It’s late – I love you more than ever, Beloved, and may the Lord continue to use and bless you.

 I love you just for always, Dear, in His love ,

  Sarah

 Colossians 3:3

 Mr. Abernathy offered to type my thesis for me – wasn’t that nice? I may take him up on it. I wuuuuuuve you.

March 9, 1946

March 9, 1946 

Dearest Darling Sweetheart —

Well, at least we are one day closer together, Lover. No mail again today, just as I had feared. Well, perhaps they will condescend to let one come through Monday or Tuesday. I’m surely lonesome to hear from you, Lover. Kentucky was saying the other night that they hadn’t heard from her brother for about a month so I think he just got to China and the Marines were supposed to let them know his address as soon as he landed, but nothing comes through. Anyhow, Darling, I love you more than ever, and I’ve thought of you lots today. You know, if you do get home by May 1st, that is only seven weeks away! That is pretty wonderful. I know, I shouldn’t get my hopes set on a definite day, but it is kind of hard to not have anything at all to look forward to, so I’m counting on May 1st, and won’t be too surprised if it is later. You id tow tweet.

The Price Family at the Sand Dunes in Indiana.

  I’ve been on the go today since early this morning and did quite a few things although they weren’t too important. It has been a perfectly beautiful day out, but I’ve been in the house all day long. The folks went to the Dunes this morning – Pop had some of your old office furniture that they replaced, and he wanted to take it out there. They were going to Valparaiso afterward. It is after 9:30 and they aren’t back yet. In fact, I’m all alone. Margie was here till about 2:00 and then she and Bob went out. She went downtown with a girlfriend of hers, and he drove her down and then went out to Valparaiso to try to fix his car at Kenyon’s. He wanted to go this morning but Margie didn’t feel very well and didn’t want to go, although she told him to go anyway. So finally he went this afternoon. I got dinner all ready for them, as they said they would be home, and just as it was ready she called and told me what they had decided to do, and she is staying with her girlfriend all night, and Bob will be out there all night I suppose. I had dinner fixed for the three of us, so I ate mine and had to put the rest away (not in me though). It was a good dinner too. I wish she had called sooner and I wouldn’t have fixed so much. Oh well, I had a better dinner than I would have if I just fixed it for myself.

  Margie vacuumed all the rugs and I dusted the furniture and wiped up the floors and cleaned the bathroom. Then I washed some clothes and the kitchen curtains and chair covers. Margie left after that and I ironed the kitchen and bathroom curtains and some other things. I put the curtains up, so now the house looks a little more like normal. It all took quite a while, and after I finished I got the urge to make another hat. So I ripped up an old turbine of mine – that multicolored striped one, and made it over entirely. I did a pretty good job of it, if I do say so, and hope it looks well on me. It was good material, and I hated to see it just sit there on that shelf, as the style was no good now. That took quite a while – longer than I had thought it would, and I started supper as soon as I finished it.

  I’d just gotten the dishes done when the phone rang, and it was Helen Christie so that was another half hour. She collapsed at school Tuesday, according to her, and they don’t know what made it. I advised her to get another doctor, which she said she was thinking of doing. She isn’t going back to school now until September, which is a good idea. She has been sick a lot this term and it was hard for her. We also talked about some of the Buena situation, and she has the attitude of a lot of them – that certain people are trying to run the church, and there is a very bitter feeling about everything. Honestly, it is hard to believe about the people there. It makes me feel very badly. I tried to make her understand what the true intent of the thing was, but you know, young people can’t see things in their true light, especially when they don’t understand the workings of the church very well. They surely need our prayers. Personally, I think there needs to be a wholehearted repentance and asking of pardon all around. It would be a healthy thing.

  After we stopped talking, I washed my hair and finished up my Sunday school lesson, and now I’m talking with my best-Beloved. I’ll be so glad when we can just talk Darling, and not have to wait a month or more for an answer. I just read over the latest letters I have from you and they helped a little, but I’m very lonesome for some fresh news, and also to know what you were doing most of February.

  Sweetheart, as you can see, there isn’t any more news, and since I’ve answered all of your letters long ago, there isn’t much I can comment on or answer. Of course, there are a thousand things I want to talk over with you, Lover, but it just won’t work on paper. Just know, Darling that I’m loving you more every day that passes and the day for your return can’t come too soon to suit me. You are dearer every hour, Darling and how I thank the Lord for all you are to me and for the wonderful blessing of being your wife. You are probably having services right now and I’ll be praying for you. I know the Lord is using you mightily – and may He continue to abundantly bless you in your work, Dear, and bring you home as soon as it is best for both of us.

 I’m just yours for always, Dear because we are His –

 Sarah

 Colossians 3:3 

March 8, 1946

March 8, 1946 

Dearest Darling Sweetheart —

And still another day without mail from you, Sweetheart. This is really getting tiresome. If I don’t get any tomorrow I’ll have to wait till Monday. But no doubt you are waiting too and I guess I shouldn’t complain, only I would surely love to hear from you, Darling and know what the latest developments are. For all I know, you can be on your way home, and if that is the case, I won’t mind not getting mail.  But it makes me mad just the same to pay for airmail service and not get any service at all. They could use some of these planes they are burning up to carry mail, it seems to me. Anyway, I love you more than ever, Beloved and I’m more lonesome for you than ever.

Inside Tremont Temple

I was working away this morning when the phone rang and it was Betty Williams. (Riley).  She and Don were in the city – he was discharged very unexpectedly, and they were on their way to his home in Wisconsin. So we arranged for them to come up to the building and we had lunch together. They look fine and are all thrilled that he is out, and all. They were going up to Garrett to see if he could get into the Spring quarter of the school, although they are quite crowded, and I doubt if they can find a place to live. We had such a nice visit and they stayed in the office and talked for almost an hour longer. They don’t like the South very much because everyone is so slow, although they do like the weather. There was quite a strong wind blowing today and Betty almost froze. Katherine is still in New York. They are all fine. Wayne Soliday is discharged now. They still don’t have a man to take Dr. Brownville’s place at Tremont Temple and she said she had heard that they want him to come back. So many were attracted by his messages and personality, and now the attendance has dropped way down. It is pretty hard to get someone to take the place of a man like that. That was about all the news she told me that I can think of. Don is now a Captain-they promoted him when he was discharged. Of course, they wanted to know all about when you are coming home and what you are doing and said to be sure to give their love and best wishes. We will have to get together when you get back, Lover.

  It has been a funny day today – there was a strong wind this morning and then it got very cloudy and rained quite hard and then it stopped raining and now the wind is turning towards the North and it’s getting colder. Pop wants to go out to the Dunes tomorrow, but maybe it will be too cold. Bob also wants to go out to Kenyon’s, if he can persuade Margie to get up at 4:00, which I doubt that he can do. Margie had to work till 6:30 tonight, so we didn’t get the dishes all done till almost 8. Then Mom washed her hair and I set it and now I’m writing to the dearest one in all the world to me. I think maybe I’ll go to bed early tonight and get up early in the morning and finish the housework, of which Mom has done the most part. However, there are still some things left to do. The house looks pretty good now. We are all clean and for your homecoming, Beloved. So hurry home before it gets all dirty again.

  I worked hard all day on bookkeeping. There’s still quite a bit to do, but I did quite a lot. Mr. Paul says he would like me to work more days a week when my school work tapers out a little, but right now I can’t spare more than a day. We were talking about the Buena situation, and he said that as yet, he feels that anything can happen. Dr. Hepburn has resigned, but it has to be voted on by the congregation as yet. However, the moderator of the Chicago Presbytery will be the moderator of the meeting, and no doubt will keep it under better control. And he said the Dr. Hepburn seems very happy about it and is talking about being Pastor Emeritus. Honestly, Willie, it is beyond me. It is a nasty situation no matter how you look at it and it makes me feel very badly. Presbytery has the dictatorial power to declare the pulpit vacant even above the wishes and vote of either the pastor or congregation, so you can see what might happen.

  Mrs. Leslie, one of the bokers, came in today to see Mr. Paul about something and asked about you. First, she asked me how I liked keeping house, thinking you were back already, but when she found out you were still away she said she hopes you get home soon. So did Mr. Schuckmell, the window shade man who was in today. And Mr. Paul wanted to know what I hear from you, which wasn’t much and he said he hopes it won’t be too much longer before you are home. But their feelings, as much as I appreciate them, are a drop in the ocean to how I feel about you and your homecoming, Lover.

  The wind is really howling outside my window – it sounds like it’s going to be a lot colder. Darling, I’m going to close I think and go to bed. I’m kind of tired. I guess I’ll wax the kitchen floor first – Bob just finished scrubbing it, bless his heart. I surely hope and pray I get some mail from you tomorrow, Lover. I love you with all my heart and life, Darling. God bless and keep you and use you.

 All my love for always in His love 

Sarah

Colossians 3:3

February 28, 1946

Willis’ letters are missing from February 22 – March 22, 1946.  We will be substituting Sarah’s letters in their place for some of the time and other letters from our archive.

February 28, 1946 

Dearest Darling —

This has seemed like a very long day for some reason or other. I thought and hoped that maybe, perhaps, there would be mail for me from you, but none came. I simply can’t understand why they can’t get it through faster than this. The fact that I got one letter in six days proves that it can be done, with the proper care and attention. Not counting that latest letter, your letters are three weeks old. Well, at least I know there are a lot on the way. But it still makes me kind of mad to pay for airmail service and get no service at all. Well, that’s off my chest. But I love you more than ever forever just the same, sweetheart. I get more lonesome for you every day, but just think, February is all gone now and we are that much closer to being together. I thought of you often.

Sarah with flowers from Willis. 1945.

  It has been a lovely day as far as the weather is concerned – quite mild and sunny, and there is a strong wind like a spring harbinger. I wasn’t out much in the weather, however. Mr. Paul called as I was eating breakfast and said he would pick me up, he drove me home too so I was glad for that. He said it would be around 8:00, so at 5 minutes to 8 I went downstairs so as not to keep him waiting, and he never came till 8:25. I wish I had waited up in my room or something. But it was nice to have a ride downtown anyway. He asked about you and sent his best wishes. He also told me some more about the condition at Buena, and it makes me feel very badly. I hate to even think about it – but they have called in Presbytery to arbitrate and what they might do makes me all hurt inside. I won’t bother you with it, though. We’ll I see how it comes out and we can discuss it much better if we are together and see what lessons we can learn from it. It just proves more and more that if you put your faith in men you are bound to be disappointed, so we must keep our eyes on Christ. But no matter what happens, I wouldn’t give anything for what the church and Dr. Hepburn have meant to me in the past. He and the church need our prayers.

  I worked all morning and part of the afternoon on the bills and got them all out. It took longer because Mrs. Paul hadn’t put in the addresses on the bill heads as she usually does, so I had to do that too. Mr. Paul said I could leave when I finished them, but he found he would have to be gone from the office most of the afternoon and didn’t want to leave the phone on answered, so he said I could study if I would stay and answer it. So I did, and got quite a bit of reviewing done for Pastoral Theology, which exam comes at 8:00 tomorrow morning. I did some more reviewing tonight after supper – just finished in fact. I think that was the most interesting course and I’m glad I took it, for I have a clearer insight into an idea of church work and the place of the pastor and his wife in it. Maybe I can be a better helper and wife to you, Lover, because of what I have learned. It will be so good to think and plan and pray with you and work with you for Christ. We can’t be too well prepared, can we? I like what Dr. Heaton always says – he hopes we never have Church’s filled with trained teachers – but we should have them full of teachers in training, which is far different and more vital. The more I learn, the more I realize I don’t know, and I pray I may never arrive at the place where I think I know everything there is to know;  that would mean stagnation.

  I knitted part of the time I was reviewing – it sort of helps me concentrate and I finished the soakers for Margie’s baby all except sewing them up. They are cute but look awfully big, but I made them just like the pattern. Pop was making some more flies tonight – he made about 6 I think. He is all hopped up with about their fishing trip again, and I surely hope it turns out well this year. Maybe we can go along. Anyhow, we might think about it. He is already written reserving the cottage. Gen and Kenyon and the kids are going too.

  Margie and Bob went to Sears and bought a new battery for their car, but he doesn’t think it helps much. He’s really putting a lot of time and energy and worry on it. I was talking to Mr. Paul some about cars today and he says the new ones are going up about 30% soon, and so the used ones will too. Well, Dear, maybe we will be located where we won’t need a car. If we do need one, the Lord will provide a way, I’m sure.

  Sweetheart, I love you more than ever. It will be so wonderful to see you and be with you again, Darling. But right now I must get to bed so I can be up early tomorrow and be at school at 8:00. God bless and keep you, Lover. I know He is using you to His glory. I love you always, Darling.

 Yours for all the ages of

 the ages in Christ –

 Sarah

 Colossians 3:3