January 12, 1946

Seoul, Korea

January 12, 1946

Sarah, Dearest Darling:

This has been a banner day for letters from you darling. I was pleasantly surprised with the arrival of five of your letters, they were for December 28th, 29th, 30th, 31st and January 1st. Those grand letters have already been read twice and I assure you that they are in for more reading. They really helped me to no end. Even though I’m really tired and weary this evening, they did help me a whole lot. I was just trying to think of how wonderful it is going to be able to be with you again.

North shore Baptist Church – Chicago.

  Besides your letters, I got a nice letter from John Mueller and a long letter from Mr. Kraft. I’m so tired and weary but I want try and write to you about it this evening but will do so later. In one of your letters which I received today, you expressed my convictions fully concerning the establishing of a mission under North Shore. Personally, I feel they are not spiritually prepared for such a venture. If they cannot find enough workers and teachers to have young people sponsors and teachers for Sunday School classes, how can they ever expect to work on the things which are essential to the success of the mission. Of course I may be a little too critical, but I’m almost inclined to think of North Shore Baptist Church as the Church of Laodicea. Honestly, I feel that church will not go further until it goes deeper. It is true they have a lot of motion, but they have very little movement spiritually. Rather than seeking a major in quantity, they ought to be endeavoring to improve upon the quality. Darling, by careful observation, since being in the service I’ve learned many things and that from watching men of all shades of faith and I’m convinced;  we got to get away from this idea of entertaining our people and specialize in training them instead. I so wish we could talk this thing over together, it’s just really hard to write things and then wait for almost a month to know what the other thinks.

  What a day this has been;  I’ve been rushed since the very minute I got up. I called early at the wards and then left for Seoul to try and pick up some mail and purchase the money orders for some of the men.  By the time I got all those things done and returned to the hospital it was time for dinner. After dinner, I delivered the mail and money orders to the various wards and then I came up here to my office for the long series of interruptions that begin and just ended about 5 minutes ago. Don’t misunderstand me, I’m not complaining, but it is a little trying at times. I didn’t get to study my message for tomorrow morning as I would like so I’m going to forget about it now and try to get a good night’s rest and get up early and go over it again.

  It has been very very cold today and the problem of heating has been a little trying. I’m sitting here typing this letter with a coat on. Under existing circumstances, I feel the Army is doing a good job. After all, the Army is now being blamed for a lot of inefficiencies and lack of a policy in our State Department; and I haven’t forgotten how certain individuals who were called Nazi and fascist-minded when they sought to do something about that policy when our former president was alive. Any student of political science knows that you do not or can not formulate a State Department Policy in a week or even a number of months. After all, policies are formed so you can build on something substantial. It is like Mr. Underwood told me (he is General Lerch’s advisor;  so appointed by the State Department in Washington), and as you know, General Lerch is now Military Governor of Korea. “ If you think the Army is fouled up you should see the State Department.”  All things considered, I think the Army has done a pretty good job here in Korea when you consider the fact that no one to this very hour has ever explained the 38th parallel. Let’s forget it, we can talk better about it when I’m home.

  Darling, it was good to hear that those clothes which I sent home came out so well after being washed by the laundry. I’m sorry they were so soiled but it was impossible to do good washing on Okinawa.

  From what you told me in your letter, you must have had a good visit with Marjorie Wells. It must be pretty hard for her to think about moving, but maybe Paul will be able to be home by then, here’s hoping so anyway. I suppose she has her hands full taking care of two children.

  I know that Charlie and Marion must be very thankful that Charlie didn’t have to leave for the Army. It is also good to know that he now has a job where he can be home every night with the family. I’m hoping that he has a good steady job now.

  Darling, you were wondering what Division I’m under now. I’m not under a Division anymore. I’m now under the 24th Corps and ASCOM 24. ASCOM means Army SERVICE command;  in other words, they are responsible for the supplies of all the forces in Korea. A Corps is the next immediate echelon above a Division. However, in some special set ups, they have a Brigade, but that is never outside a service forces such as Ordinance, Quartermaster or Engineer. For instance, we did have one Engineer Special Brigade here but that has been deactivated now. In Europe, I understand they had a number of them and it seems they specialized in setting up port facilities and after they were completed the Port Battalions took over.

  By the way Darling, in one of your letters today you were wondering if I needed any razor blades. I do not, I still have quite a few of those you purchased for me before leaving the States. I’m hoping I won’t have to use many more before I see you, Lover. Sweetheart, it is so late and I’m so tired I must say good night. God bless you Lover in all things.

 Always just yours Beloved

 in Christ’s love,

  Willis

 Colossians 3:3

January 11, 1946

Seoul, Korea

January 11, 1946

Sarah, My Beloved Darling Sweetheart:

Two long years ago tonight I saw you for the last time Darling, and those intervening 24 months seem almost like that many years. These days it seems so long and trying, but at least we are 2 years near the time when we can be together all the time. That night as the El Capitan spread towards the west coast my heart seemed to become heavier with the passing of each mile. And the passing days have only intensified my longing and loneliness for you, Beloved. You are so very precious in every way and I know I love you more than ever and I’m so thankful unto the Lord for the privilege which is mine in being your husband. The nurses around this hospital are the first women I have seen for almost 2 years, but they only give me more reason to be thankful unto the Lord for a wife like you are. Miss Mason and Miss Asmus are the finest of the nurses, but Beloved, you outshine them as the sun outshines the moon. Again, thank you, Darling, for being such a good Christian wife to me.

Seoul National University Hospital.

  I spent the entire morning preparing and planning the services for this Sunday. There were several interruptions but I did manage to accomplish quite a lot. After dinner, I called on all the wards and then took care of several things which needed attention. It doesn’t seem that I’ve accomplished very much today, but after all, I did have time to do some studying. I had hoped there would be some mail from you today, but there wasn’t a bit of mail of any kind. I’m hoping that there will be some tomorrow.

  After supper, I came back up here to the office and studied for a while for our Bible class. There were only nine in our class this evening, but as I said before, several of our old faithfuls have to work in the evenings so that makes it very difficult to have a larger number in attendance. I wanted to come right up here and try to write several letters this evening, but some of the men wanted to talk and ask questions so I sought to help them, praying that it would strengthen them in their Christian life. They left and then I wrote a letter to Major Mason which I will enclose in this letter for you to read.

  Darling, I think that was a good idea of you to send fifteen dollars to my father for Christmas. That way he can buy what he would like or needs the most. I was glad to know that Gen and Paul liked the subscription to the National Geographic so well. As you said, it should be very helpful and educational for the children also.

  It will indeed be interesting for you to be on the committee for the VCS of the Chicago area. I suppose Doug picked you because of your experience last summer at North Shore.

  I was glad to know that Mrs. Heaton volunteered to give you some helpful suggestions in the matter of writing your thesis. It’s too bad Dr. Mason doesn’t show more interest in that respect. You would think that he would be eager to help students in that way. It was something to hear about Earl Stemple being back in the States. I know Jane must be very happy about it. Does she still work at the Seminary? Well Lover, I’m pretty weary tonight, so I think I will close for tonight. God bless you richly in all things.

 Always and forever just yours in

 Christ’s love,

 Willis

 Colossians 3:3

January 10, 1946

Seoul, Korea

January 10, 1946

Dearest Darling Sweetheart:

Another day has slipped by and it was so very good to have your wonderful letter of December 27th.  Of course, the news of Grandma Norman’s homegoing made me feel badly. But she lived a good full life and she was always a blessing to all who ever knew her. I’m so sorry she had to suffer so long. Naturally, it has been a great strain on Wesley and Edith. Even though you had been telling me from time to time about her condition, I was rather taken back with the news. After all, she has always seemed like my very own grandmother and I feel a deep loneliness in my heart tonight because of her departure. And then I was also shocked to hear that Chaplain Davender’s wife had passed away. I do hope that you will have the opportunity to meet him someday, he is a mighty fine man.

Willis Reed with his Aunt Cornelia (left), Grandmother Mabel (on his right) and his mother Mildred (on the right of the picture. Photo taken around 1933-34 in Chicago.

And then I was surprised to hear about Connie, but knowing my grandmother, I can understand how she magnifies troubles so it probably isn’t too bad. However, I shall be glad to pray about the matter.

  This has been a rounder of a day to say the least. I was up early and around to the wards this morning. And then I came up here to the office and wrote a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Mason, the father and mother of Miss Mason. I just thought I would drop a note to them and assure them of the good work she is doing and the fine Christian character she displays in spite of all the temptations. And then I wrote a letter to Carl Anderson. I went through all the Christmas cards and birthday cards which I received and sent them to you by free mail. They were four large envelopes full. I thought you would like to see all of them as soon as possible.

  I had just started to study this afternoon when two more old friends from the 7th Division came over to visit me. They stayed for about 45 minutes when three more friends from the Division came in to visit Don and I. They stayed for almost 2 hours. However, in the meantime, I received a call that another man wanted to see me. I told them to send him up, it was another marital case. Naturally, that took time and by that time it was supper time so I had my evening meal and came back here to my office to go over my message again for the midweek service. They were only 19 in attendance this evening. Rather disappointing to say the least, but I did my best and I do hope it did some good.

  After service was over another soldier talked to me for a while, but as soon as he left, I wrote a short letter to the Normans. I’m afraid it isn’t much of a letter, but I wanted them to know that I have been thinking of them.

  It has been quite cold today, in fact, it has been rather difficult to keep the building warm enough. Well Lover, even though it is very late I want to try and catch up on some of your old back letters. I can see by your letter of the 27th of December that you were thinking I may be on the coast. Please Darling, remember that I’ll tell you when I will probably leave, for I will instruct you not to write to me anymore. For I’ve found we can make ourselves most unhappy if we don’t watch out for what rumors we believe. Right now it seems that the earliest possible time I could get back there would be around the first of April, note EARLIEST.  That doesn’t mean I’m not going to do all I possibly can to be there before that, but War Department orders may change in a matter of minutes.

  Darling, you haven’t sent me any pictures lately and I’m really very lonesome for them. Please remember that I too like to have pictures of my Sweetheart very much. That is one thing you cannot give me enough of. It will be so good when I don’t have to depend on pictures though. What joy will be mine when you are right by my side and we can talk and pray and do those things which have always been so dear to our hearts.

  From what you said in your letter, Dr. Ackley must have given a very fine message. I only wish they had more of that kind of preaching in North Shore Baptist Church. I really feel that Dr. Wilson will have to change before that church will ever go forward spiritually. Forgive me if that sounds critical, I don’t mean it that way at all. It is very easy to sense the church’s need for a spiritual ministry in the weekly North Shore Baptist. Honestly, Darling, I wish you would leave the church or change, for spiritually they seem weaker than I’ve ever known that church.

  I’m glad to know that you had such a nice visit with Florence Arnold and it is good to know that Frank is all set in his work at the University of Chicago. It’s good that they can be together again. I was also glad to hear that Bernice is so happily married.

  From what you said in your letter, I can readily see that the choir at Buena gave a wonderful rendition of the Messiah. I agree with you fully, Mr. Baer is a wonderful choir director and Mrs. Baer is a splendid organist.

  I was glad to know that you finally received the box of silk and rayon that I sent home to you. I think it was sweet of you to think of making some baby things out of the material. From the looks of things, those field glasses that mailed to you a long time ago have been stolen or lost. I had so wanted to have them but if they’re gone that’s that. Well, Lover, your little sweetheart is very tired so I think I will close for tonight. God bless you, Beloved in all things.

 Just yours forever in Christ’s love,

 Willis

 Colossians 3:3

 P.S. Enclosed find the Christmas note I received from Carl Anderson.

January 9, 1946

Seoul, Korea

January 9, 1946

Dearest Darling Sweetheart:

I had so hoped that there would be some mail from you today but none came in. Your letters always help me so very much. Perhaps there will be some mail tomorrow, here’s hoping so anyway. In spite of all I had to do and the long cold ride I had in the open Jeep, I could not help but think often of what we were able to do together for the last time two years ago today. Do you remember, Lover? This is been a long long two years and how I pray and hope it won’t be too much longer before we can be together.

Picture taken by Willis and sent to Sarah. 1946.

  I was up early this morning and got around to all the wards before leaving here at 10:30 for Seoul to pick up mail and money orders for different patients. I had dinner with some of my old friends back at the 184th and then I left for Jinsen.  That was really a long old miserable ride. The roads were covered with ice but I was careful and came through all right. I was supposed to be down there for an important chaplain’s meeting. It was after 3:30 by the time the meeting was over, so by the time I drove all the way back up here, it was after 5 o’clock. As soon as I had my supper, I came back here to my office to study for this evening’s Bible class. There were only ten in attendance this evening. Some of our old faithfuls had to work, so naturally, that cut down on our attendance. We managed to finish the first eight verses of the third chapter of John. We had a very fine discussion. We went over half an hour overtime.

  A couple of soldiers came up here and talked with me for a while, and naturally, that took time. Before starting this letter to you I wrote a letter to my father and to Paul and Gen. I’m going to enclose Paul and Gen’s letter in this letter for you to save and read. It is such a blessed privileged to have friends like Paul and Gen.

  It has been very cold and windy all day, and of course, that made my drive to Jinsen all the more difficult and trying. Sweetheart, I know this isn’t a good letter but I’m so very tired and I must close and try and get some rest before time to get up. God bless you and the folks, and remember, I love all of you more than ever.

 It is so good to always be

 Just yours in Christ’s love,

  Willis

 Colossians 3:3

January 8, 1946

Seoul, Korea

January 8, 1946

Dearest Darling Sweetheart:

It is again very late, Darling. But I must try to get a letter off to you before going to bed. It is so good to know that you are such a wonderful Christian wife. The assurance and constant abiding of Your Precious Love is a benediction to my heart and soul. I had hoped that we would have some more mail today but none came in. 

  This has been a long lonely day, the sun didn’t shine at all and it is getting much colder tonight. This morning I called in some of the wards and after that came back up here to my office to do some studying. Chaplain Myers came out here to see Chaplain Minor who is being discharged to duty. As I told you once before, he is a member, or I should say assigned, to the 6th Division. His transportation was supposed to arrive this morning sometime, but for some reason or other it never did show up. We cannot understand why they didn’t arrive but all arrangements are now made for them to leave in the morning.

  I had wanted to get some things planned for mid-week service and this coming Sunday but several other things came up which had to be taken care of. I had a couple more marital cases to handle which are so mixed up. Darling, how thankful I am that our love and marriage are founded on Christ. I’ve seen so many of the others go on the rocks. We shall discuss some of these things when we are together, Beloved.

  The big thing was that this evening I had arranged for Rody Hyun to bring some of his talent out here to the hospital this evening to put on the musical show for our hospital. It was appreciated by all and the auditorium was filled to capacity. He brought four other musicians and singers with him. Rody sang 2 songs (American) for us in Korean, they were, “ When You and I Were Young Maggie” and “Carry Me Back to Old Virginia.”  Darling, it was a great success and everybody enjoyed it very much. I only wish you could have been there to witness the program. Be sure to tell the Krafts about it for I’m sure they will be interested to know about it. They will probably also be interested to know that Rody is planning on opening the Seoul Conservatory of Music on February 1st. Sweetheart, I’ll tell you more about it when we are together again. I had made arrangements for them to have their evening meal with us and after the program, we had some coffee and some apple pie. And then I gave them some fruit cake and candy to take home to their families.

  I had planned on coming up here to my office and writing this letter to you right away but two old officer friends from the 184th came over to see me and they stayed for a long time and visited. It was Lieutenant Dobson and Lieutenant Thorn. It was good to see old friends and it kind of helps to know that they think enough to come over and visit.

  Everybody (soldier personnel) in Manila, Tokyo and Korea are pretty much upset about the new release from the War Department that demobilization must be slowed down. Morale is hitting a new low. Darling, I’m so very anxious to get home myself, but honestly, I do become pretty much disgusted with the way some of the soldiers act and carry on. Actually, they seem to believe that they deserve every consideration just because they have the uniform on for a while. It is hard to express to you fully on paper my feelings concerning this whole thing. But in brief, I would say this much, sure there is a lot of inefficiency in the Army but no institution or organization is efficient in itself, and that which it has is because of persons. And I would further say that all this blundering stupidity is not in the higher brackets, the lower brackets contribute their share. Actually, Darling, the “I don’t care attitude” of so many of the personnel is alarming and I can assure you it isn’t a very pleasant problem for those of authority who are really seeking to do their best for our nation and those in their command. Honestly, Sweetheart, it all boils down to this; far too many are only interested in how much they can get, not how much they can give. Our blessed land needs a revival of the Holy Spirit’s power, for the days are dark and men need Christ.

  We are about the only nation on the face of this Earth that actually has enough of everything to keep life happy, but you would think we got it because of our superiority in everything to read some articles or listen to some talk. Actually, my heart is so burdened for the souls of men. Well, Beloved, I will not go into a lot more detail for it is hard to do so in a letter. I’m going to keep on doing my best and I’m hoping it won’t be too much longer until I’ll be able to leave for the good old USA and my Beloved Darling Wife. It is rather wearing to hear people complain from morning to night and never stop for one solitary moment and try to think of things we have to be thankful for. I’ve been praying earnestly about this Sweetheart and I feel that His own good time things will work out for the best of all concerned. In the time which is yet mine here in Korea and this hospital, pray that I may be led to some souls who need Christ.

  I must close , it is almost the beginning of another day and I’m pretty tired. God bless you my Lover in all things.

 Forever and always just yours,

 in Christ’s love,

  Willis

 Colossians 3:3

January 7, 1946

Seoul, Korea

January 7, 1946

Sarah, My Beloved Darling:

This has been another rounder of a day, and right now I’m so tired and weary I can hardly hold my head up. However, it is good to have days like this one because that way they seem to slip by faster, and I’m glad for that fact, for the time can come none too soon for me. I’m so very lonesome for you in every way. There wasn’t any mail today but I hardly expected any after receiving as many letters as I did yesterday.

  I spent almost the entire morning calling on the men in the various wards. I did get to do some reading before dinner but not very much. As soon as dinner was over, Don, Chaplain Minor and Miss Mason and I left for Seoul. I left Miss Mason, Chaplain Minor and Don at the home of the French Consulate and his family while I went to all the various places to try and pick up mail for different patients. I also got several money orders for the men. And then besides that, I took care of a problem case which needed attention. After that was done, I returned to where Miss Mason, Chaplain Minor and Don were waiting. I do wish you could see their children (the French consulates).  They have two girls and a boy. The girls are 5 and 6 years old and the little boy is four. They are the sweetest things you can imagine. I’m sure you know what I was thinking, don’t you? Won’t get be good when we can have our own family, Beloved?

Life magazine. January 7, 1946.

  It was rather late this afternoon when we got away, and as a result, we got back here rather late for supper. They told us all about the trying experiences they had in different concentration camps. They are hoping to leave for France via the United States within the next two months. Someday I’ll tell you all about the fine visit we had. I know it will be of interest to you.

  After having a snack to eat I delivered the mail to the various patients and also the money orders. And behold, when I returned to my office I found four more old friends over here to visit Don and I from the 184th Infantry. It surely was good to see all of them again. We had a most enjoyable evening and I was interrupted on a couple of occasions to see men about some problems they had. The other men just left a few moments ago for the 184th. So you can see now that my evening just completely slipped away. It is good to see old friends.

  It was rather cool today and it’s getting much colder again this evening. Well, Beloved, this isn’t a very good letter I know but I must try to have a little rest before morning. God bless you Lover in all things, and remember, I love you much more than ever.

 Always just yours, Lover,

  Willis

 Colossians 3:3

January 6, 1946

Seoul, Korea

January 6, 1946

Sarah, My Dearest Darling:

This noon I was surprised with the arrival of four more of your letters, they were like mana to my hungry soul. I had hoped for one or two but the arrival of four really surprised me. They were yours of December 22nd, 24th, 25th and 26th. I’ve just finished reading them through the third time. Lover, those letters are just so good but it will be so much more wonderful to just talk to you again. Besides your letters, I got a lovely letter from Paul and Gen, Louise Davis (birthday card), and a nice little note for Christmas from Raymond Cox’s wife.

  I was up at 6 o’clock this morning and came over and shaved and then before breakfast did some more studying on my sermon for this morning. Enclosed in this letter find a bulletin which will give you an idea of the services and what I preached on today. This morning we only had one hundred and twenty-eight in attendance and this evening 52. This last week we sent a lot of patients back to the States. Naturally, that hurt our attendance and then besides we had some of our own personnel return on points. With such a constant change all the time it is really difficult to build anything very stable.

  After dinner I studied for a while, then both Don and I left for Seoul to help plan for the first Youth for Christ meeting in Seoul.  By the time we had helped with the program and other things and drove back here, it was time to eat. After supper I studied more on my evening message and then came up here to read your letters again, but a soldier came in to see me about a certain situation. That took time and then I reread your letters again and started this letter to you.

  It has been very cloudy and cold most of the day. At noon it started to snow and it’s been snowing quite steadily ever since. If it keeps up all night, we will certainly have a lot of snow on the ground. The roads are really miserable now. And it is to be remembered roads in Korea are not near as good as they are in the States. There have been quite a few accidents lately. Whenever I go out to Seoul I just am as careful as you can be.

  Darling, in your letter of Christmas Eve you were in the clouds because of the telephone conversation you had with Mrs. McNeil. I had talked it over with Lieutenant McNeil and suggested that you call each other, which I thought would be nice. I’m afraid her husband was a little mixed up on this business about all I was waiting for was transportation. I feel quite sure that he got mixed up with someone else. For in the last 2 weeks we’ve had quite a number of doctors, dentists and MAC’s leave here for the States. Sweetheart, PLEASE don’t let your feelings go away up like that for I assure you that as soon as I know when I’ll probably be on my way I will tell you myself. And I will do so by informing you not to write to me anymore. Please steer clear of rumors. By heeding them very much a person can make themselves positively sick. It is hard enough as it is without making ourselves feel worse by getting our hopes up. As things look now, the earliest possible time of my arrival home will be around the first of April. But please don’t count on it. I’m in the Army now – but I’m hoping not much longer.

Sarah Reed and her father, Herbert Price (the Chief). Christmas 1946.

   I was glad that it cleared enough so you could get out to Valpo for a while on Christmas Day. I know dear Mom would have felt terrible if you could not have gone out. From what you told me in your letter, I can see that you all had a very lovely time. I was glad to know that you got so many very nice Christmas gifts. From what you said in your letter, the new dictionary which the folks gave us must be very beautiful and I know it will be very helpful. Be sure to thank them for me.

Darling, according to one of your letters you said that Byers had really muddled things up out there at Bethel Church over the missions question. That’s certainly made me feel very badly. I do pray and hope they get that thing settled, for it is far from a healthy condition. Some of the brethren need to investigate things just a bit more before becoming so critical of others.

  By the way, I take it that you were unable to get the desk fountain pen for Don. Perhaps they will soon have some out so we can get one for him. That was truly fine of him to send us the Life magazine for this coming year.

  Sweetheart, I’m so tired and weary I can hardly see so I think I will close for tonight and try to get a fairly good night’s rest. God bless you Lover, and remember that I love you much more than ever I have before. Be sure to give the folks my love.

 Always just yours, Lover,

 in Christ’s wonderful love,

   Willis

 Colossians 3:3

January 5, 1946

Seoul, Korea

January 5, 1946

My Dearest Darling Lover:

This has been another one of those days from the very moment I got up until now. How thankful I am to know that we are one day nearer to the time when we can be together again. I had hoped that we would have some mail today, but none came in. Just the same, I love you much much more than ever. You id tow very tweet in every way and I do wove you more dan ever for ever and ever and I said it first and wast. Won’t it be good when we can talk again to each other in our own little love language?

  As soon as breakfast was over, I went around to the wards and visited with some of the men and then started on that long and cold journey to Seoul to see if I could pick up any mail for any of our patients. I also took care of some money orders for some of them. I also stopped by one headquarters and helped plan for the Youth for Christ which were hoping to get started here in this whole area. The roads are very miserable and I did see some vehicles in the ditches along the way. I was very careful and managed to get back all right. It was just noontime when I arrived back here at the hospital.

Willis receiving his 1st Bronze Star from General Hodge. October 10, 1945.

  I spent a goodly portion of time calling in the various wards and then came back here to the office to do some studying. Upon my arrival back here, I found that Lieutenant Blocker had delivered some pictures to me which he had taken on the day when I was decorated by Lieutenant General John R. Hodge. It is a terrible picture of me, but it’s me and I think you would like to have a copy. If you will note my wedding ring shows up very plainly and you know how proud I am of our rings for they mean so very much. And also in the pocket over which he is in the process of pinning the medal is the two picture folders which I have carried of you, my Sweetheart, ever since I’ve been overseas. Darling, he also gave me the negative which was very nice of him. I’m going to send you two of them in this letter for you. Be sure to let me know if they came through all right.

  After I finished supper, I came back up to my office and found five of my old faithfuls from the 184th out here for the evening, it was certainly wonderful to see them. We really had a blessed time in Christian fellowship. It is so good to know such fine Christian fellows. They are completely dissatisfied with Chaplain Wells. The Bible classes have gone to pieces and no one seems to show much interest. It really makes me feel very badly. I cannot quite understand Paul. I will say no more now, when we are together we should be able to talk this thing over. However, we can pray for him. Those men just left before I started this letter to you, but even though it’s late I’m tired, it was good to have such fellowship. I still have a lot to do on my sermon so I will have to cut this letter short tonight. I’m sorry but it is very late now and I do want to have something worthwhile.

  God bless you, my Lover, in all things and be sure to give the folks my deepest love.

 Forever and ever just yours in Christ’s love,

 Willis

 Colossians 3:3

January 4, 1946

Seoul, Korea

January 4, 1946

Dearest Darling Sweetheart:

Well, another day has slipped by and we are a little bit closer to the day when we can be together again. Actually, for some reason or other, the time just seems to drag along. It will be so very good to be with you again. I had hoped that there would be some mail from you today, but none came in. Your letters help me a whole lot, but Sweetheart, it will be so very good to be able to have you to talk again. Just to look into your eyes again will be so very wonderful, for I can still remember how beautiful your eyes talk and how good they always made me feel deep within my heart. We have had some more men leave, but so far they haven’t made any kind of new announcement which would affect me. I thought they might make some kind of new arrangement at the first of the year. And now I’m hoping they will do something before the 1st of February. For instance, around the 15th of January.

  This morning early I called on some of the wards then I came back here to my office and spent the rest of the morning trying to decide on what to preach on this Sunday. I also planned the bulletin and Don will cut the stencil tomorrow morning. After dinner, I called on more of the wards. I took care of a couple of problem cases and then I came back to do some more studying. One of the nurses wanted to see me. I talked to her for about an hour and I believe I was able to help her some. I’ll tell you all about the situation later when we are together. I really felt sorry for her, but she is a very fine woman and I feel confident that everything will come out all right. At least I assured her that I would pray about it and would be glad to help her in any way.

  After having supper this evening, I studied for a while and then another person came up to see me, before he left it was time for Bible class to begin. We only had 11 in attendance this evening in our class. We finished our discussion of the second chapter of John. As soon as the class was over I came right up here to the office and wrote a letter to the folks and now I’m writing to the one I love the most and will now and for all the ages of the ages. You id tow very tweet, tweetheart.

It has been really very cool today even though the sun shone very brightly all the time. I certainly hope this doesn’t last a long long time. I don’t mind the cold weather if you have the facilities for keeping warm.

  Sweetheart, I’m glad to know that you are finding Pastoral Theology so interesting. Dr. Whitesell was good in teaching that class when I was in seminary also. I agree fully with you, he does have some very fine common sense in that respect. As you say, there are many things to be considered in being a pastor of a church. And I’m so thankful to the Lord for a good wife like you.

  From what you told me in your letter, Dr. C. Oscar Johnson really gave a fine message at the seminar. He is a very good man and I only wish we had more like him.

  It was good to hear that my old clothes which you sent the laundry came back looking so well. Perhaps it won’t be too much longer until we can have a place of our own again and we can put our things away without too much trouble.

  Darling, the statement which Dr. Stiansen made during the seminar session sounded very very good. And knowing him as I do, I can almost see him making the statement. I’m truly sorry for some of those short-sighted brethren. With such an attitude they will probably do much harm. We surely need more men like Dr. Stiansen.

  Lover,  for some reason or other I am very tired tonight so I think I will close and try to get a good night’s rest. God bless you, Lover, in all things.

 Forever Yours in Christ’s

 Abiding and Keeping Love,

 Willis

 Colossians 3:3

January 3, 1946

Seoul, Korea

January 3, 1946

Sarah, My Dearest Darling:

Today I had another pleasant surprise and that was the arrival of your good letters of December 21st and 23rd. The one of the 22nd is missing but I do hope it will come tomorrow or soon. Words cannot describe to you how good it is to have your good letters. I’ve just finished reading them through again. Besides your letters, I got letters from the following people:  Betty Weiskopf, Bob and Lois Peterson (announcement of the birth of their baby son, I’ll send the announcement in this letter so you can see it), Carson’s, and my Uncle Ralph and Gladys at Hampton, Nebraska. And then besides that, I received Christmas cards from the following friends:  Bob and Lois Peterson, Lt. Erb and wife, Jack and the Bertha, Dave and Phyllis Van Valey, Mother Reid, Chaplain Service Corps, Dolores, Vivian, Harry Allen’s and Mrs. Harris (wife and mother of three children, her husband was killed in the battle of Okinawa).

  I got up early this morning and had my breakfast, and after taking care of a few details around here, I left for Seoul (by the way, we are about eight miles from Seoul).  It rained during the night and it was really slushy and wet and shortly after I left it turned much colder and the roads were terrible as far as driving with concerned, it was covered with a sheet of ice. I drove very carefully all the way, only exceeding 20 miles an hour on a couple of occasions. I was really thankful for I was able to pick up a lot of mail for the patients and they really enjoyed it. And to see the expressions on their face it was worth going to hunt it up for the many different ones. You’ll be interested to know that the little shops and stores are all still closed. Things seem to be settling down now and I hope the trouble will all blow over. For it is a sure thing that trouble will make our stay that much longer. As soon as the shops open up again, I will see if I can pick up something for Mom and Bob and Margie.

  Well Lover, you’ll be interested to know that I sent your little gift by AirMail this morning. I do hope that it gets through all right and I do hope it makes good time. This is one thing I’m really concerned about getting through in good shape. I wrapped as best I could and sealed it close with Scotch tape so it ought to come through all right. I do hope it will remind you of just how much I love you. You are such a wonderful Darling Sweetheart. While over by the 184th, I saw Chaplain Wells for about 10 minutes. He’s all right and seems to be quite discouraged with everything. When we are together we can have a good talk about the whole thing.

  After having had my dinner, I visited the men in the various wards and delivered their mail which was a joy indeed for I know how good I always feel when I receive mail. And then I had an appointment with one of the dentists here. He cleaned my teeth and put in a very small filling for me. (It was a lower tooth R13, that doesn’t mean much to me but the Chief will know which one that is, he said one very small portion of the gold filling I have evidently leaked).  He complimented me on the beautiful gold fillings I have, saying you really have a very fine dentist. I let him go on for a while and then I told him the Chief did it he told me to tell him that he was and is a mighty fine dentist.

  In one of your previous letters, you were wondering if I wanted you to send me copies of the pictures which I am taking over here and sending back to you to be printed. No, don’t bother or it will mean more for me to carry when I return, and I’m hoping it won’t be too much longer before I start my journey back to you. I can see what they look like when I return to the States.

  From what you told me in your letters, since Bob bought the car I can see that he has certainly been devoting much time to try and to get the car into proper running order. I’m hoping that he will soon get the car in shape so he won’t spend so much time out there in the garage. As you say, he can hardly expect to have a clear mind for his work when working so late at night.

  Your boy’s class has really been a handful, and from what you have said, I believe you are doing very well and from when the man takes over he will find it very difficult also. I’m sure it isn’t you, it just happens to be one of those kinds of classes that you have sometimes;  thank the Lord not too often.

  It was good to know that North Shore did so well on the Sunday of Sacrifice. Darling, again I want to let you know that what you felt led to give was entirely all right with me. For the need is very great. I hope the NBC is able to fully reach their goal for over and above giving.

  By the way, while calling on the wards today a certain patient who was in Okinawa for the few weeks before coming up here in November, showed me some pictures which he took while down there. He gave me four and I’m sending them on to you, for I know you will enjoy seeing them. That was certainly kind of him.

  Sweetheart, it is very late and I’m a little weary so I think I will close for tonight. God bless you and the folks in all things. I wove you more dan ever and ever forever.

 I am ever just yours in Christ’s love,

   Willis

 Colossians 3:3