August 30, 1943

August 30, 1943

Dearest Sweetheart,

We just finished drill and I hurried up to my room – took a shower and by the time I was dressed the mail orderly brought the letters from you. They were so very sweet and my Darling, I appreciate all the news you send because it helps out even though we have little time to think of anything but our work. I love you more all the time, and I continually praise the Lord for you and your love and devotion.

Sarah Price (center in flowered dress) with “The Chief” – her father Herbert Price to the right.

I’m sorry that the “Chief” had such a hard time while away. I hope he gets better very soon. Evidently, the Chief
thinks I need a course that will help my stubbornness.

We take map reading because we got to be able to locate graves that we have buried men in during the battles. So if they move them later to a single burying ground they can be found.

This morning we had our first examination in Military Courtesy, as far as I know I only missed part of one question.

I didn’t get a chance to write to you yesterday because I went again to Park St., and after the service one of my friends and I were invited out to dinner in a very lovely home. The folks were very nice to us, and home cooked food really hit the spot. We didn’t get back here to Harvard until 4 P.M., and I started to work on a speech for our class in “Army Morale.” It was to be a “Sex Morality Speech.” It was not to be sociological, ethical or sermonic. And I tallied on it until midnight when I finally called it quits, but I had finished. As I told you I was on duty (guard) from 2 A.M. Sunday morning until 7 A.M., I was very tired but was determined to finish that speech. You should hear the grunts and groans during our drilling – it doesn’t bother me very much, in fact I like it. If I am called to active duty over seas I want to know how to do what my soldiers have to do.

Dear, I mentioned in a letter before about trying to find me a watch in Chicago. If you can get a Hamilton, Elgin or Langine, that will do the job. Don’t spend a lot of money just for me. When I get my uniform allowance I will send you part of it, but that will be a week or so yet. By the way, I will have to endorse this check and return it (written on the side of the letter) to you because I cannot get away from here to the post office to register this letter, we will have to trust that you’ll get it all right.

So long Dear, I love you more than ever,

Forever in Him,

Willis

One thought on “August 30, 1943

  • John Reed
    August 30, 2017, 3:30 am

    The passage near the end of this letter (“You should hear the grunts and groans during our drilling – it doesn’t bother me very much, in fact I like it. If I am called to active duty over seas I want to know how to do what my soldiers have to do”) illustrates how Willis had both a natural inclination and deep understanding of what others were experiencing. As a result, the empathy he exuded as a young man carried through his life and touched the lives of countless thousands!

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